Follow
Us On...
Facebook
RSS
 






Redfish Ceviche

Comments: Leave | View
On: Wed, Dec 15, 2010 at 11:18AM | By: Capt Gregg McKee


Ceviche is one of the most widely eaten dishes in all of Central and South America as well as much of the Caribbean.  It is basically raw fish or shellfish marinated in the juice of citrus fruits, most commonly limes and lemons, and mixed with other fresh fruits and vegetables.  There are hundreds of variations of ceviche and each region puts its own signature on the dish depending on what local ingredients are most commonly available.  In the Bahamas, the famous conch salad is actually a type of ceviche and is a staple of almost every meal.  In Peru, where ceviche is the national dish, white sea bass and key limes make up the traditional base ingredients.  Shrimp are most popular in Ecuador and Panama and tomato juice is used most heavily as their marinade.  No matter where you might travel in the southern latitudes, you'll encounter some form of locally prized ceviche.

Ceviche is one of the most widely eaten dishes in all of Central and South America as well as much of the Caribbean. It is basically raw fish or shellfish marinated in the juice of citrus fruits, most commonly limes and lemons, and mixed with other fresh fruits and vegetables. There are hundreds of variations of ceviche and each region puts its own signature on the dish depending on what local ingredients are most commonly available. In the Bahamas, the famous conch salad is actually a type of ceviche and is a staple of almost every meal. In Peru, where ceviche is the national dish, white sea bass and key limes make up the traditional base ingredients. Shrimp are most popular in Ecuador and Panama and tomato juice is used most heavily as their marinade. No matter where you might travel in the southern latitudes, you'll encounter some form of locally prized ceviche.

Folks who might feel a little uneasy about eating uncooked fish should not be so worried when it comes to ceviche. The strong citric acids used as a marinade actually break down the proteins in the meat and "cook" it in much the same manner that heat does. A small piece of raw fish dropped in a bowl of freshly squeezed lime juice will turn white and flakey in a matter of minutes, just as if it were dropped in boiling water. The meat will have the same texture as if it were cooked and none of the fishy flavor of something truly raw. It will also absorb the flavors of any additional spices and seasonings.

Here in Southwest Florida our local waters hold dozens of species that can be used to make great ceviche. Although they’re not served in restaurants thanks to their commercial ban, redfish are plentiful and easily caught by recreational anglers. Their firm and mild meat is perfect for this type of dish. Here is an easy recipe for redfish ceviche that can be prepared in less than twenty minutes and requires only a few dollars worth of extra ingredients. It will make a very filling lunch for four or can be served as an appetizer for an entire dinner party.

Ingredients:
2 lbs. redfish fillet
2 large vine ripe tomatoes
1 cucumber
1 green pepper

1 red pepper
1 large onion
1 clove garlic
6 limes
2 lemon
1 12 oz. can of spicy Bloody Mary mix
Old Bay
Olive Oil

Fresh ground pepper

Soy sauce

Directions: Cut the redfish into thumbnail size chunks and place in a bowl. Slice the limes and lemon in half and squeeze the juice over the fish. Add two tablespoons of Old Bay, mix and let marinate in the fridge for at least two hours.

Chop all the vegetables into similar size chunks and mince the garlic. Mix together in a large bowl with two spoonfuls of extra virgin olive oil, several dashes of soy sauce and the can of spicy Bloody Mary mix. Add to the fish and stir. Serve it cold with fresh ground pepper.




Comments

Be the first to leave a comment.


Leave A Commment

Allowed HTML tags: <a href=""> <abbr title=""> <b> <em> <i>
Please no link dropping, no keywords or domains as names; do not spam, and do not advertise! rel="nofollow" is in use